Liriodendron tulipifera flower

The University of North Carolina
Herbarium
A Department of the North Carolina Botanical Garden

 
 


Collectors of the UNC Herbarium
Information compiled January 2006 by Carol Ann McCormick,
Assistant Curator of the University of North Carolina Herbarium.
Special thanks to Priscilla Gunther, Archivist, West Virginia University,
for providing photographs of Hannibal & Tyreeca Davis.


Tyreeca Elizabeth Stemple Davis
(17 October 1902 - February 1987)


The University of North Carolina Herbarium has databased approximately 40 specimens collected by Hannibal Albert Davis and spouse, Tyreeca Davis. No doubt more will be found as databasing continues. The Davises usually signed their specimens "Mr. and Mrs. H.A. Davis."

Davis_Tyreeca.jpg

Hannibal Davis (left), Tyreeca Davis (middle), and unidentified man (right) ca. 1960
Photograph courtesy of the West Virginia University Photographic Services

Tyreeca Elizabeth Stemple was born in West Virginia to David William Stemple (1870-1950) and Bertie Stemple.  In 1910 the family, including Tyreeca and younger sibling, Fritz, were living in Eckert, Delta County, Colorado.  The 1910 census lists David as a “general farmer.”1  In 1920 the family was living in Claquaton, Lewis County, Washington, where D.W. was working as a mill wright.2 By 1925 the family was living in Morgantown, West Virginia and David was working as a carpenter.3

Tyreeca Davis earned an A. B. (1926) and an M.A. (1928; Thesis title "Periodic quadratic transformations, and quartic curves left invariant by them") in mathematics from Cornell University.

Hannibal Davis and Tyreeca Stemple were married in 1925 in Monongalia, West Virginia, and Hannibal was a member of the mathematics faculty at West Virginia University in Morgantown.

Davis' botanical interests included Rubus and Viola. Rubus leggii was named by H. A. and Tyreeca Davis in William Clarence Legg's honor (Davis, H.A. and Tyreeca Davis. 1953. The genus Rubus in West Virginia. CASTANEA 18(1): 1-31). "This species is dedicated to the memory of the late William C. Legg, naturalist of Mount Lookout, Nicholas County, West Virginia, whom we accompanied on several pleasant and profitable field trips" (p. 27-28).

The Harvard Herbaria Database lists CM (Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA) as a major repository for Davis' herbarium specimens, though it seems likely that WVA (West Virginia University in Morgantown, WV, USA) would have many as well.

A paper in CASTANEA in 1982 lists the address for corresponding with H.A. and Tyreeca Davis as "Rt. 2, Box 140, Freeport, Florida," where they presumably retired after H. A. retired from the Mathematics faculty at West Virginia University in Morgantown, WV.

Tyreeca Davis died in Freeport, Walton County, Florida in February 1987.

Dr. Wayne Davis and Dr. Elizabeth Davis Swiger established the H.A. and Tyreeca Davis Herbarium Endowment at WVA in honor and memory of their parents.


 Anonymous (1988) Davis Herbarium Goes to Carnegie Museum. CASTANEA 53: 83.

The private herbarium of Hannibal A. and Tyrecca E. Davis has been given to the Carnegie Museum in Pittsburgh. This consists of a 10,000 sheet general collection with emphasis on West Virginia, and 10,000 sheets of Rubus, mostly from eastern North America. The Rubus material is the basis for the Davis' (with A. M. Fuller) revision of the North American Eubati (Castanea 1967, 32: 20-37; 1968, 33:50-76; 1969, 34: 157-179; 1969, 34: 235-266; 1970, 35: 176-194; 1982, 47: 216-219). Although it contains no types, this is the most valuable collection extant to use in identifying an unknown specimen. For each species the Davises had a "working type", usually from the type locality or nearby, which they had carefully compared to the type specimen. For many species names the type is too poor to be recognizable: too immature; floricanes only; primocanes only; parcifronds or novirames; a mixture of more than one species, or other such problems. With considerable effort, often observing at different stages of development and sometimes growing the plants, they were able to prepare good material that they were confident represented the species described.

The Davises visited most of the type localities for North American Rubus names, and their collection contains representatives for nearly all names.

All the Davises' working materials regarding Rubus (notes made when examining types, manuscripts, correspondence, annotated reprints, etc.) have also been deposited at the Herbarium of the Carnegie Museum.

 


Partial list of publications:

Davis, H.A. and Tyreeca Davis (1953) The genus Rubus in West Virginia. CASTANEA 18(1): 1-31.

Davis, H.A., Albert M. Fuller, and Tyreeca Davis (1982) Some comments on Rubus. CASTANEA 47(2): 216-219.

Davis, Hannibal A. (1990)  Studies in “Rubus.”  Castanea 55(1):  22-30.

SOURCES:

1.      Ancestry .com  1910 United States Federal Census.  Provo, UT, USA:  Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 2006.  Year:  1910; Census  Place:  Eckert, Delta, Colorado; Roll:  T624_114; Page:  10A; Enumeration District:  0030; Image:  180; FHL microfilm:  1374127.

2.      Year:  1920; Census.  Place:  Claquaton, Lewis, Washington; Roll: T625_1933; Page:  3A; Enumeration District:  131; Image:  369.  Source:  Ancestry.com.  1920 United States Federal Census.  Provo, UT, USA:  Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 2010.

3.      Morgantown, West Virginia, City Directory 1925.  Ancestry.com.  U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989 (Beta).  Provo, UT, USA:   Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 2011.

 


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University of North Carolina Herbarium
CB# 3280, Coker Hall
University of North Carolina
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3280
phone: (919) 962-6931
fax: (919) 962-6930
email: mccormickATSIGNunc.edu  

Last Updated: 10 October 2012