Liriodendron tulipifera flower

The University of North Carolina
Herbarium
A Department of the North Carolina Botanical Garden

 
 


Collectors of the UNC Herbarium
Information compiled July 2012 by Carol Ann McCormick.
 Special thanks to Peter Carini, Dartmouth College Archivist.
The UNC Herbarium seeks more information (particularly a photographic portrait) of G.L. Foster.
Please email Carol Ann McCormick mccormick@unc.edu


Goodwin LeBaron Foster
(4 June 1891 – March 1977)
 


The University of North Carolina Herbarium has databased approximately 40 specimens collected by Goodwin LeBaron Foster, who signed his specimens and scientific papers “G.L. Foster.”  All Foster’s herbarium specimens in NCU’s collection are from Florida in the mid-1960’s.  Lee County – Bonita Springs in particular – was a favorite collecting area, though Foster also collected in Collier, De Soto, Hendry, and Monroe Counties.

All NCU’s specimens collected by Foster were a gift from the Jesup Herbarium of Dartmouth College (HNH) in 2002.  If Foster collected in New Hampshire, it is likely that those remain at HNH.

Goodwin LeBaron Foster was born in Calcutta, India in 1891 to Charles (b. 1850)  and Elizabeth Y. Andros (b. 1851) Foster.  According to the 1900 Federal Census, Goodwin’s father, Charles, was a dealer in teak and the family resided in the town of Norton in Bristol County, Massachusetts.  Goodwin’s siblings included Elizabeth A. (b. in Massachusetts September, 1885), Richard A. (b. in Massachusetts November, 1887), and Sybil (b. November 1892 in India).2  The 1910 Federal census lists the Foster family as living in Sharon, Norfolk County, Massachusetts.3  

Goodwin graduated from Dartmouth College in 1913.1  He seems to have spent some time at the Missouri Botanical Garden, as on a 1914 publication, he is listed as “Teaching Fellow in the Henry Shaw School of Botany at Washington University.”  On 5 September, 1918 he married Grace E. Page in Candia, New Hampshire, and in 1920 they were living in Berkeley, Alameda County, California, where Goodwin was working as a biochemist at the University of California, Berkeley.4,5,8  He earned a Ph.D. from Harvard in 1921, and was on the faculty of Columbia University as a professor of Biological Chemistry for 30 years.1

Goodwin & Grace Foster had two daughters, Mary (b. ca. 1920) and Dorothy A. (b. ca. 1927).6

Goodwin LeBaron Foster died in Manchester, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire in March, 1977.7


 Partial list of publications:

Foster, G.L.  1914.  Indications regarding the source of combined nitrogen for Ulva lactuca.  Ann. Missouri Bot. Garden 1:  229-235.
Schmidt, C.L.A. and G.L. Foster.  1921.  A cheap and convenient source for glutamic acid.  Soc. For Exp. Biol. & Med., Proceedings v. 18:  205-206.
Schmidt, C.L.A. and G.L. Foster.  1922.  The separation of hexone bases from a protein hydrolysate by electrolysis.  Soc. For Exp. Biol. & Med., Proceedings, v. 19:  348-351.
Foster, G.L.  1923.  Studies on carbohydrate metabolism.  I.  Some comparisons of blood sugar concentrations in venous blood and in finger blood.  J. Biol. Chem.  55:  291-301.
Leland, J. [Jessica] P. [Pendleton. and G. [Goodwin] L. [LeBaron] Foster.  1932.  A method for determination of thyroxine in the thyroid.  J. Biol. Chem. 95:  165.
Schockaert, J.A. and G.L. Foster.  1932.  J. Biol. Chem.  95:  89.
Foster, G.L., A. B. Gutman, and E.B. Gutman.  1933.  Total and thyroxine iodine content of thyroid gland after injection of saline anterior pituitary extracts.  Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med.  30:  1028-1032. 
Foster, G.L.  1934?.  A comparison of the effects of administration of iodide and diiodotyrosine on the iodine and thyroxine content of the thyroid.  J. Biol. Chem. FULL CITATION NEEDED.
Foster, G.L., D. Rittenberg, and Rudolf Schoenheimer.  1938?  Deuterium as an indicatior in the study of intermediary metabolism.  xiv.  Biological formation of deuteroamino acids.  J. Biol. Chem.  COMPLETE CITATION NEEDED.
Shemin, David and G.L. Foster.  1946.  The isotope dilution method of amino acid analysis.  Ann. New York Acad. Sci.  47:  119-134.

Sources:

1.       Personal communication, email from Peter Carini, Dartmouth College Archivist, to McCormick 11 July 2012.

2.      United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls.  Accessed 11 July 2012 via:  Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.

3.      Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C.  Accessed on 11 July 2012 via:  Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.

4.      New Hampshire Marriage Records 1637–1947." Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2011. “New Hampshire Statewide Marriage Records 1637–1947,” database, FamilySearch, 2009. New Hampshire Bureau of Vital Records. “Marriage Records.” New Hampshire Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics, Concord.  Accessed 11 July 2012 via:  Ancestry.com. New Hampshire, Marriage Records Index, 1637-1947 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.

5.      Fourteenth Census of the United States, 1920. (NARA microfilm publication T625, 2076 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA. Note: Enumeration Districts 819-839 are on roll 323 (Chicago City).  Accessed 11 July 2012 via:  Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.

6.      United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1930. T626, 2,667 rolls.Accessed on 11 July 2012 via:  Ancestry.com. 1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002.

7.      Social Security Administration. Social Security Death Index, Master File. Social Security Administration. Accessed 11 Jly 2012 via:  Ancestry.com. Social Security Death Index [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2011.

8.      Anonymous.  1922.  The present location and occupation of former graduate students and others who have undertaken investigations assisted in the laboratory or herbarium.  Missouri Botanical Garden Bulletin 10(1):  16.

 


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University of North Carolina Herbarium
CB# 3280, Coker Hall
University of North Carolina
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3280
phone: (919) 962-6931
fax: (919) 962-6930
email: mccormickATSIGNunc.edu  

Last Updated: 11 July 2012